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Now that the days are longer and the weather is warm, the amount of time spent playing and working in the sun increases — and so does the risk of skin cancer. 

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Muscle weakness and swelling, trouble walking up a flight of stairs, difficulty breathing: Don’t mistake these as inevitabilities of growing older. It could be a sign of myositis, a rare autoimmune disease that involves chronic inflammation of muscles. Along with that inflammation comes othe…

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Shanna Reed, a nurse at the Innovative Unit at St. Vincent Indianapolis, remembered a cancer patient she befriended. Near the end of the patient’s life, she had two requests. The first was a cheeseburger, which Reed happily supplied. The second was that Reed be the one to deliver the patient…

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While driving Toby Miller felt his right arm weaken and slide off the steering wheel. He then became dizzy and pulled to the side of the road. Miller doesn’t remember how he got to the hospital. He had a stroke. At the time he was 36.

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Indiana law forbids both medical and recreational marijuana, so many might be confused when they see cannabidiol (CBD) products now legally available in medicinal and natural food stores. Both CBD oil and marijuana derive from cannabis, so why is one legal when the other is not?

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Johanne Hesse described his son Paa-Nii as joyful and always smiling, but there was a period where Paa-Nii, who has autism, constantly lived in a state of stress. Living in Oklahoma at the time, other students picked on Paa-Nii to the point where Hesse had to visit the principal’s office onc…

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In recent years, society went from describing opioid abuse as a moral failing to framing it as a disease. The change in tone is fitting because substance abuse is not just a physical problem.

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From stick marks and infections to the psychological alterations and pains of withdrawal, opioids can take a heavy toll on the body and brain. It’s a lot for one person to handle, especially as many struggling with addiction feel the burden of a stigma that discourages them from speaking up …

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African-Americans in Indiana have a 12 percent higher incidence rate and a 38 percent higher mortality rate from colon cancer than whites, according to Hoosier Cancer Research Network.

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Many people may believe that cervical cancer is a problem of the past. Prior to the 1940s, it was a major cause of death in women of childbearing age. According to the National Institute of Health, invasive cervical cancer is now considered to be the 14th highest cause of cancer deaths in wo…

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A frightening diagnosis with breast cancer in 2007 led Lisa Hayes to leave behind her legal career and devote herself to serving others facing health crises. Hayes is the director of women’s health services at Gennesaret Free Clinics in Indianapolis and executive director of the R.E.D. (Reac…

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  Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 (HSV-2) is a growing public health concern for many African-American Women. In 2010, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that 48 percent of African-American women between the ages of 14 and 49 were infected with HSV-2. This was a shocki…

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Not only is February Black History Month and American Heart Month, it’s also Children’s Dental Health Month. Dental health is an important component of a child’s overall well-being as children with poor oral health may develop coughs, colds, sore throats and upset stomachs more frequently, c…

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It’s now February, and the weather’s only constant feature is unpleasantness. As Hoosiers retreat into the warm indoors from the cold, many may not realize the potential health risks found inside their home.